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Compassionate End-of-Life Care for Your Pet in College Station


THRIVE offers compassionate End-of-Life services for pets in College Station, Texas. We know this is one of the most difficult decisions you as a pet owner will have to make regarding your pet's well-being. We want to assure you we are there every step of the way.

Our clinical staff will be able to help you determine the best manner in which to create the most comfort for your pet. The following information is to help pet owners understand the end-of-life process for our loved ones.

Download Euthenasia Information Download Grief Tips for Children

What to Expect?

Preparing yourself, your family, and your pet
Once you have made the decision and booked an appointment, taking the steps to prepare can help ease the process. For your pet, it can be comforting to bring their favorite toy or bed so they have a familiar smell from home. Many also bring along a special treat for their pet. The most important thing is to help your pet feel calm and comforted.

For you and your family, it’s best to make time for everyone to say their final goodbyes, either before or after the euthanasia. If time allows, you may consider a family gathering with your pet to celebrate their life before the appointment. For the day of, have a plan so you know who will go to the vet and who wishes to be present. Some want to be with their pet when they pass, while others prefer to say goodbye beforehand. This is a very personal decision and you should decide what’s best for you. You are also the best person to decide if children should join. Young children may not fully understand the concept of death and their confusion may make the experience more stressful. If your child is older, explain what’s happening in advance to prepare them if you’d like them to attend.

What does the process look like?
When you first arrive, your veterinarian will explain the procedure before they begin. This is the time to ask any questions if you need further explanation. The actual procedure is simple and peaceful, done at a pace for your pet’s comfort. First, a sedation injection will be given to ensure your pet is relaxed. Once you are ready, a final euthanasia injection is given. It’s virtually painless and works rapidly and peacefully. You may observe involuntary muscle contractions or hear deep breathes, but these are physical reflexes and don’t mean your pet is in pain or is suffering. Your veterinarian will confirm that your pet has passed on.

When you first arrive, your veterinarian will explain the procedure before they begin. This is the time to ask any questions if you need further explanation. The actual procedure is simple and peaceful, done at a pace for your pet’s comfort. First, a sedation injection will be given to ensure your pet is relaxed. Once you are ready, a final euthanasia injection is given. It’s virtually painless and works rapidly and peacefully. You may observe involuntary muscle contractions or hear deep breathes, but these are physical reflexes and don’t mean your pet is in pain or is suffering. Your veterinarian will confirm that your pet has passed on.

After, you may continue to spend time with your pet to have your final goodbyes. The doctor will excuse themselves for a few minutes to give you time alone.

What happens after?
At THRIVE, you have three options once your pet passes. You can take them for a home burial (be sure to check local, county or state ordinances to make sure this is legal) or choose for them to be cremated. If you choose cremation, there are two options available.

  • Private Cremation - A private cremation is when only one pet is present during the cremation process. Your pet will be identified with a stainless-steel ID tag and their cremains to be returned to you in College Station, Texas.
  • Communal Cremation - A communal cremation is when more than one pet is present. Your pet’s cremains will not be returned, but you do have the option of a clay paw print to memorialize your pet.

Memorial Once your pet passes, there are many ways to celebrate their life. For some, they may wish to hold a formal or informal funeral service. Others bury their pet or their ashes and place a marker in a special location in College Station. Those who have a cremation may also request their pet’s ashes to be placed in an urn and keep at home. Many mark the passing of a beloved pet with a simple framed photo. Whatever you choose is right for you and is the best thing to do.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I make an appointment in College Station for Euthanasia?

You may stop by one of our College Station hospitals to speak with our staff or call any of our locations to schedule. Keep in mind, due to the nature of this service, you will need to be a current client and have already established a relationship with the THRIVE hospital in College Station you would like to use.

How much notice do you need?

These decisions are difficult, and there is no perfect timing. Ideally, calling a few days ahead gives both the family time to prepare and allows best opportunity to choose the time of the day that works best for everyone. But, we understand that circumstances and timing are not always predictable. Whether you have time to prepare or the decision comes upon your family suddenly, please contact us when you know it is time to make an end of life decision.

Should I call if I suspect I will need your services in the coming weeks?

Yes. The best thing to do is to have a scheduled consultation with the veterinarian to discuss the timing and decisions related to end of life services. This way both you and the veterinary team can prepare and talk through any special circumstances.

What if I need a service in the middle of the night?

If your pet is in need of end of life services after normal hours, please contact the closest after-hours/emergency veterinary services provider in your area for assistance.

What about children, should they be there?

The presence of children during an end of life procedure is a very individual family decision. Click here for some recommended grief resources to help your family make the appropriate choice.

Questions About The End-of-Life Process with Euthenasia

Can my pet eat or drink water prior to the procedure?

Yes, your pet is welcome to eat or drink prior to the service.

Will euthanasia be painful for my pet?

No. Professionally provided end of life services are done in a very humane and gentle way. The pet is treated with dignity and with the care of a team of people who are there to help them make a painless and comfortable transition. At your visit, your veterinarian will be available to tell you more about the process and all related details to what your pet will experience. We encourage you to ask questions so that all members of the family are completely comfortable with the end of life experience for the pet.

Are complications possible?

This is a medical procedure, and your veterinarian will explain any possibility of adverse events during your visit. This is a very peaceful procedure that does not typically have complications or adverse events. If this is a concern or you have had a previous experience in life that end of life went poorly, please bring these concerns to your veterinarians attention so they can be only discussed prior to proceeding.

How long does the process take?

To make the end-of-life service completely focused on your pet and your family, we recommended you come early to your appointment to spend some time with your pet in the exam room prior to any of the veterinary team entering to talk about next steps. If possible, we also recommended you come by the hospital prior to this visit to process payment and make all decisions related to cremation and memorial items. The procedure itself is less than a couple of minutes and is very peaceful. The timing of the whole visit is largely based on your indications of readiness to the hospital team. Most end of life visits are between 30 to 45 minutes in length to allow time for the pet and family to spend a few moment together.

Will my other pets grieve?

Yes, other pets will experience a grieving process. It will be important that they are supported and cared for similarly to the human members of the household. They may need a bit of extra attention, some company, some extra nurturing, and some time to adapt to the loss of their housemate.

View our Grief Resources Page for more information >

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